Share

Medical Malpractice

Monday, August 29, 2016

Researchers: Medical errors now third leading cause of death in United States


Nightmare stories of nurses giving potent drugs meant for one patient to another and surgeons removing the wrong body parts have dominated recent headlines about medical care. Lest you assume those cases are the exceptions, a new study by patient-safety researchers provides some context. Their analysis, published in the BMJ on Tuesday, shows that “medical errors” in hospitals and other health-care facilities are incredibly common and may now be the third-leading cause of death in the United States — claiming 251,000 lives every year, more than respiratory disease, accidents, stroke and Alzheimer’s. Martin Makary, a professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who led the research, said in an interview that the category includes everything from bad doctors to more systemic issues such as communication breakdowns when patients are handed off from one department to another. “It boils down to people dying from the care that they receive rather than the disease for which they are seeking care,” Makary said.
Read more . . .


Monday, August 6, 2012

How to Know If You Have a Medical Malpractice Case.

Your Doctor Made a Mistake – But Do You Have a Medical Malpractice Case?

If you  have received medical treatment and even suspect that you have been the victim of medical malpractice, it's very important to consult with an attorney as soon as possible. In New York there are certain  time limitations in which to start a medical malpractice law suit.  It is generally 2 1/2  years from he date of the medical malpractice.However, if your case involves a NYC hospital operated by the NYCHHC, the time period is much shorter and  a Notice of Claim must be filed within 90 days of the malpractice. The lawsuit must be started within 1 year and 90 days.

The term “medical malpractice,” sometimes called medical negligence, refers to a situation in which a health care provider fails to act in accordance with standards of accepted medical practice, causing injury or death to the patient. A physician, nurse or other health care professional is considered negligent if his or her conduct is below the “standard of care,” i.e. the degree of care and skill that the typical health care professional would provide to a patient seeking treatment for similar symptoms or under similar circumstances.

It’s not just doctors and nurses who can be sued for medical malpractice. Any licensed health care provider who is in a position of trust can be held accountable for diagnosis or treatment that causes injury or death. These can include lab technicians, radiology technicians, specialists who interpret your test results, ambulance companies and their employees, and facilities such as hospitals, nursing homes and pharmacies.

There are many types of mistakes which may be considered “medical malpractice,” depending on the overall circumstances of your injury or illness and the treatment you received. Common medical malpractice claims include:

  • Incorrect or missed diagnosis
  • Failure to conduct appropriate diagnostic tests
  • Failure to properly treat your medical condition
  • Failure to properly administer medications
  • Failure to properly perform a surgical procedure
  • Failure to manage a pregnancy or safely deliver a baby
  • Failure to warn you of the risks of treatment, which would enable you to give your fully informed consent to the treatment
  • Failure to anticipate a problem which should have been anticipated in accordance with the standard of care

Even if your medical treatment results in a negative outcome, the doctor’s or nurse’s conduct may not rise to the level of malpractice or negligence. Furthermore, even if the treatment you received clearly fell below the standard of care and is deemed “negligent,” you may run into difficulties bringing your claim due to the high cost of litigating a medical malpractice case. Because medical malpractice cases often hinge on the definition of the “standard of care” required for that particular situation, experts must be consulted and retained to prepare reports, give depositions and testify in court.

You should consult with an experienced medical malpractice attorney who can help you determine whether the health care provider’s negligence was truly the result of malpractice and whether your case is worth pursuing. Your attorney will review your medical records and will likely have to retain a medical expert who can review your records to evaluate the merits of your claim. Due to the significant expense involved in performing such reviews and obtaining assistance of experts for a medical malpractice claim, many meritorious cases settle before the case goes to trial. in the New York metropolitan area.

 

 You have questions. We have answers. 

 Call us at 800.741.7808

RANDAZZO & GIFFORDS,PC

Serving  the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, Staten Island, Nassau and Suffolk.

Will will arrange to meet at a location convenient to you, including your home or work place.

 

  

 

 




The attorneys at the Law Offices of Randazzo & Giffords, P.C. assist clients throughout the New York Metropolitan area including Bronx, Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Nassau County and Suffolk County.



© 2018 Randazzo & Giffords, P.C. | Attorney Advertising
700 White Plains Road, Suite 381, Scarsdales, NY 10583
| Phone: 914.821.6900

Medical Malpractice | Automobile Accidents | Premise Liability | Police Injured in the Line of Duty | Wrongful Death | Construction Accidents | Municipal Liability | Civil Rights Violations | Surgical Errors | Birth Injuries | Failure to Diagnose Cancer | Dental Injuries | Nursing Home Abuse | Truck Accidents | Personal Injury | Slip/Trip and Fall | Product Liability | About Our Firm | Practice Areas | Verdicts & Settlements

Attorney Web Design by
Zola Creative